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Annual accountability

Information about the annual accountability process, why it’s important, and resources to assist with preparing submissions. Annual accountability applies to DCJ service providers that deliver funded contracts.

The purpose and objectives of annual accountability

Annual accountability is a mandatory process that ensures the service providers we contract are accountable for the funding they receive and the services they’ve agreed to deliver on our behalf.

As an annual checkpoint for performance, it’s designed to work with the regular performance monitoring that forms part of our ongoing engagement with service providers.

The nature of that engagement is described in the Charter for working with contracted service providers.

In the charter, we commit to working with service providers to achieve the outcomes agreed in contracts. Service providers, in turn, ensure their organisations support stable and outcomes-focused service delivery.

Annual accountability is a practical demonstration of both parties honouring those commitments.

This robust process of checks and balances is designed to achieve the following four objectives:

  1. Ensure government funds are being used as agreed in contracts
  2. Identify any issues affecting a service provider’s ability to maintain stable, uninterrupted delivery of services
  3. Determine whether a service provider continues to have the capacity and capability to deliver better outcomes for our clients
  4. Reveal trends and common issues across programs and districts

The annual accountability overview and process description fully explains annual accountability, why it’s important to DCJ, and how we use the information we collect.

Overview of the process

Every year, your organisation is required to report how you’ve complied with key elements of the contract with us and used the funding received from DCJ. There are separate requirements for reporting annual accountability at the corporate and contract levels.

Corporate-level accountability requires you to report financial health at the whole-of-organisation level, declare compliance with your ongoing responsibilities and contractual obligations, and address requirements for any annual accountability focus areas required for the financial year.

Only one corporate-level accountability submission is required, regardless of the number of separate contracts you held during the accountability reporting period.

Contract-level accountability requires you to report income and expenditure against the funding your organisation received from DCJ, declare unspent funds, and certify you met the financial responsibilities and contractual obligations for the reported financial year.

Separate contract-level accountability submissions are required for each contract you held during the accountability reporting period.

Your annual accountability submission is a key input to our process of reviewing and assessing your performance.

We may contact you one or more times during this process.

Checking and accepting your submissions

Our priority is to verify you’ve answered all questions on the forms and uploaded all the required documents.

Then we’ll perform a preliminary review and crosscheck of the financial information to ensure it’s been reported as required and to address any inconsistencies as soon as possible.

In addition, we’ll organise recovery of unspent funds, if required.

We’ll contact you if:

  • there’s incomplete or missing information on a form
  • documents haven’t been either filled in correctly, signed or uploaded
  • there’s incomplete or inconsistent financial information; for example, figures typed in the contract-level accountability form don’t agree with figures in the submitted income and expenditure statement
  • we need to make arrangements with you to recover unspent funds.

‘Accepting’ a submission means we acknowledge its receipt and that we’ve completed these preliminary checks. While conducting the performance and risk assessments, we may still contact you about information in, or documents uploaded with your submission.

Conducting annual performance and risk assessments

We conduct annual performance and risk assessments at the corporate and contract levels.

To do this, we:

  • conduct a full financial analysis of your reported accountability and review your performance over the previous 12 months to identify any issues which may affect your ability to deliver services
  • assess the level of risk, based on whether any issues were identified and their severity
  • take the initial actions necessary to assist you to address any issues.

The assessments are based on your annual accountability submission, your regular performance reporting, and other information gathered during your interaction with DCJ over the previous 12 months.

We’ll contact you if there are any financial discrepancies or other matters to be clarified.

Note that under our contract with you, we can audit or review your accounts at any time, even though we’ve accepted the financial reporting of your annual accountability submission.

For 2020–21, 97.63% of the performance and risk assessments were rated low, medium or no risk, meaning only 2.37% of assessments were classified as high or very high risk. The assessments confirmed that most organisations are performing well and meeting their contractual obligations.

The annual accountability overview and process description:

  • describes the process we follow
  • provides more detail about the annual performance and risk assessments
  • explains when formal improvement plans may be required, according to the risk rating.

The benefits of annual accountability

The annual accountability process contributes to the continual improvement of performance by DCJ and the service sector.

From our perspective, annual accountability offers a detailed picture of the current capacity and performance of our service providers. This, in turn, gives a snapshot of the strength and viability of the funded services sector.

The information captured during the process:

  • guides us in how to better support the sector
  • enables us to identify ways to improve and innovate at the program and sector levels.

From an individual service provider’s perspective, annual accountability confirms how well an organisation is governed and financially managed.

It also enables us to gauge whether the organisation has the capacity and capability to continue to deliver the agreed services.

From a sector perspective, the annual accountability process assures DCJ and our service partners that the service sector continues to be capable of delivering better outcomes for our clients.

Due date for submissions

You must submit your annual corporate- and contract-level accountability documents via the Contracting Portal on or before 31 October 2022.

We encourage you to lodge your submission as soon as you can.

If your financial year-end date isn’t 30 June, submit your corporate-level accountability within four months of your financial year-end.

However, all contract-level accountability must be completed using the DCJ financial year-end date of 30 June.

The following table provides an example of the accountability due dates based on different financial year-end dates.

Financial year-endAnnual accountability due dates
30 June

Corporate level: 31 October

Contract level: 31 October

31 December

Corporate level: 30 April

Contract level: 31 October, based on the DCJ financial year

How we deal with late submissions

It’s important that we receive your financial reports by the due date, as agreed in the contract with us. If your submission hasn’t been lodged by 31 October, we may issue a notice of breach to your organisation. In addition, the contract gives us the option to suspend and/or reduce your funding payments until we receive your submission.

Resources for the 2021–22 process

The following resources consist of:

  • documents that explain the process and requirements for completing your submissions
  • a sample template for the contract-level income and expenditure statement
  • forms to be filled in, signed and uploaded with your submissions.
ResourceUsage
Reporting annual accountability 2021–22

This is the complete guide to everything you need to know about this year’s annual accountability process:

  • the process timeline
  • what you’re required to submit to DCJ
  • requirements for reporting any additional payments and grants received for responding to COVID-19 and the 2022 floods
  • this year’s arrangements for unspent funds
  • the information you’re required to report in the corporate- and contract-level forms
  • detailed explanations of the fields on the forms, to clarify the information we require.
Information video

Our annual accountability information video explains important aspects of annual accountability and your obligations. It also takes you through the process, including how to fill in the forms in the Contracting Portal.

Reporting indirect contract administration costs The information on this web page clarifies what costs make up indirect contract administration costs and what you need to know about reporting them as expenses for your contract-level accountability.
Service provider declaration for corporate-level accountability 2021–22

This must be filled in, signed and uploaded to the Contracting Portal as part of your corporate–level accountability submission.

It's used to confirm that your organisation:

  • complies with its ongoing responsibilities and contractual obligations
  • is a going concern and has the ability to meet its debts
  • has submitted all information and documents requested by DCJ, and that they are true and correct.

The declaration form enables you to list any exceptions to meeting the requirements, and the reasons for the exceptions. The declaration form must be signed by authorised or delegated signatories of your organisation.

Annual accountability certification for contract-level accountability 2021–22

This must be filled in, signed and uploaded to the Contracting Portal as part of each contract-level accountability submission.

It's used to certify that your organisation met the financial responsibilities and contractual obligations for the reported financial year, including that you:

  • provided services as agreed in the contract
  • complied with the activities and performance requirements stated in the applicable Program Guidelines or Program Specifications, and achieved the results required
  • have the ability to return any unspent funds, if required
  • collected and provided the data and information required, and that it’s true and correct.

The certification form enables you to list any exceptions to meeting the requirements, and the reasons for the exceptions. The certification form must be signed by authorised or delegated signatories of your organisation.

Application for consent to retain and use funds unspent in 2021–22

You’re only required to complete this form if your organisation wants to retain unspent funds and the guide states that you may apply for consent to retain and use those unspent funds.

You must complete a separate form for each program, however, you may include multiple contracts for a program on the same form.

Fill in, sign and upload your application to the Contracting Portal as part of the applicable contract-level accountability submission.

Contract-level Income & Expenditure Statement templateThis template is available to use if your organisation doesn’t have a standard income and expenditure statement.
Contracting Portal

Use the Annual Accountability – Corporate and the Annual Accountability – Contract forms allocated to you in the Contracting Portal to complete your organisation’s annual accountability submission.

Unspent funds policy

This page states the requirements for returning or retaining unspent funds.

On this page

General requirements for unspent funds

As a general rule, your organisation must return unspent funds to DCJ, as agreed in the contract with us, for return to NSW Treasury.

This approach enables us to:

  • reduce the level of unspent funds across programs, so that funding is directed to deliver the services for which it has been allocated
  • pool funding at the program level to:
    • better address strategic priorities
    • generate greater purchasing power and capacity to respond to those priorities.

There may be circumstances when this general rule doesn’t apply, as each DCJ program has its own requirements in relation to unspent funds.

These requirements guide whether you may retain and use unspent funds for the program services.

If your contracted services aren’t listed in the exceptions that follow, you must return any unspent funds to DCJ.

Returning unspent funds

To return unspent funds, we’ll discuss with you the amount, the method and the date the funds are to be recovered. We’ll confirm what’s agreed in writing.

Our preferred method of recovery is to withhold funds from your next quarterly payment or over several quarterly payments, depending on the amount.

If you have no current contract with DCJ, you can return the funds by cheque or electronic funds transfer. If this applies to your organisation, we’ll give you the necessary details.

If there are exceptional circumstances affecting your ability to return unspent funds, speak to your DCJ contract manager about the method and timing of their recovery..

Exceptions to the unspent funds general requirements for 2021–22

Your organisation may retain unspent funds if:

  • the amount is $250 or less, or
  • the contract is for:
    • Permanency Support Program (see special note, below)
    • Targeted Earlier Intervention (TEI) program (see special condition, below)
    • Family Connect and Support (FCS) program (see special condition, below)
    • Thriving Families NSW (TFNSW) program
    • Supporting Families into Early Childhood Education (SFiECE) program
    • domestic and family violence programs, and sexual violence programs (see special condition, below)
    • Industry Partnership program
    • Rent Choice Start Safely Trial program
    • Crisis Refuge Replacement program
    • Carers Grants program
    • Youth Frontiers program
    • food programs
    • community housing leasing programs, or
  • your organisation received a special COVID payment in 2021 or 2022, and was given an extension to carry forward spending. This includes payments for:
    • the non-government refuge cleaning stimulus funding
    • FOCAS (Family Outreach and Child Adolescent Services) brokerage made available in the 2021–22 financial year to the relevant Specialist Homelessness Services and Homeless Youth Assistance Program providers (see special condition, below)
    • expanding services in the area of domestic and family violence, including payments under the National Partnership Agreement and additional funding for Staying Home Leaving Violence, or
  • the funding was paid in advance for use in following financial years, or
  • your organisation received written approval from DCJ to retain unspent funds for future use with the program.

Special note for PSP and OOHC Contracted Care providers

DCJ has completed the 2019–20 reconciliation of PSP payments made to service providers contracted to deliver Foster Care and Intensive Therapeutic Care (ITC) and agreed this with most providers. By June 2023, DCJ aims to complete a reconciliation of PSP payments for the 2020–21 and 2021–22 financial years.

As specified in the payment provisions of the PSP Program Level Agreement (Clauses 5.3–5.5), the advance quarterly payment following the reconciliation will be adjusted to account for funds owed to or to be recovered from you.

If you’ve identified unspent funds and DCJ has verified them during the reconciliation, you may retain these unspent funds for future use with the program, as agreed in the contract. If reconciliation results in a discrepancy in the payment, DCJ will contact you to resolve.

Note that COVID-19 Emergency Action Payments made to PSP and OOHC Contracted Care providers are subject to monthly reconciliation.

Special condition for TEI and FCS programs

While you have DCJ’s consent to retain unspent funds, you must obtain our consent prior to committing the funds, for how and when you will use them for the program services. Refer to the instructions for Applying for consent to retain and use unspent funds, below.

Special condition for domestic and family violence programs, and sexual violence programs

You must apply for DCJ’s consent to retain and use unspent funds for the program services. Refer to the instructions for Applying for consent to retain and use unspent funds, below.

Special condition for FOCAS

2021–22 FOCAS funding may be rolled over pending performance review by your DCJ contract manager. You’ll be notified of the review’s outcome when it’s completed.

Any unspent portion of the 2020–21 FOCAS and 2020–21 Under 16’s stimulus package must be returned to DCJ during the 2021–22 annual accountability process.

Applying for consent to retain and use unspent funds

If applicable to the program, you must obtain consent from DCJ to retain and/or use unspent funds for a specific purpose.

To do this, you must fill in and submit an Application for consent to retain and use funds unspent in 2021–22, separate to your annual accountability reporting.

Send the completed form and any supporting documents by email to your DCJ contract manager before 5pm on 31 October 2022. The earlier you submit the form, the sooner you will receive a decision from DCJ.

In the application you must:

  • state the reason the funds were not spent
  • explain how your planned re-allocation and use of the funds will meet the core objectives of the program
  • describe the expected benefits of the re-allocation of the unspent funds, and how this would be in addition to the normal contract outcome for which annual funding is provided
  • provide a plan, budget and timeframes for the benefits to be achieved.

If you submit an application for consent to retain unspent funds, your DCJ contract manager will contact you to discuss it.

Your DCJ contract manager considers whether to support the application and makes a recommendation to the program manager, who makes the final decision.

Once a decision is made, you will be notified, in writing.

Reporting indirect contract administration costs

The information on this page aims to clarify what costs make up indirect contract administration costs and what you need to know about reporting them as expenses in your contract-level accountability.

This supersedes all previous information issued by DCJ in relation to reporting management and/or administration costs for annual accountability.

On this page

What are ‘indirect contract administration costs’?

Indirect contract administration costs are all indirect costs incurred by you in support of delivering the services agreed in the contract with DCJ. These costs include all management, administrative, fixed and variable overhead costs.

Indirect contract administration costs are reported as expenses, separately for each contract you hold with DCJ, as part of your contract-level accountability.

What sort of expenses can be included as indirect contract administration costs?

Include all expenses that aren’t directly connected to providing the services to DCJ clients as agreed in the contract.

Typical examples of indirect contract administration costs are:

  • corporate overheads allocation
  • fees paid to another organisation to perform administrative services such as payroll and auspice
  • rent, shared office space costs and rates
  • utility costs for telephone, water, electricity and gas
  • licensing fees
  • insurance
  • corporate services such as accounting, auditing, technology, marketing, legal, security and motor vehicle costs.

We understand that an indirect cost for one organisation may be a direct cost for another. That’s why your organisation’s indirect contract administration costs must be justifiable and reasonable based on providing the services agreed in the contract.

Has DCJ set a threshold for these costs?

No.

These costs are a legitimate and necessary business expense, and can vary from organisation to organisation, depending on:

  • the size of the organisation
  • the complexity of running a program
  • the impact in the community, where having more impact may relate to higher administration costs and vice versa.

So, there’s no one-size-fits-all standard ratio or percentage that can be used to measure the reasonableness of the costs associated with managing a contract.

However, your organisation must be able to justify the amount reported.

What are the requirements for reporting these costs?

For expenses to be included in the indirect contract administration costs you report, they must:

  • have been incurred and/or paid by your organisation during the applicable annual accountability reporting period
  • be reasonable, based on the DCJ services agreed in the contract
  • be relevant to providing the services agreed in the contract
  • be justifiable, based on your accounts and records
  • not include any direct costs; this means don’t include operating expenses incurred by your organisation that can be directly attributed to delivering the services and achieving the contract outcomes
  • not have been included as part of any other expense reported for the same contract
  • be apportioned correctly when applied to multiple contracts
  • not have been included in the expenses of any other contract (with DCJ or another funding agency) you’ve reported for the same annual accountability reporting period.

Do indirect contract administration costs need to be itemised?

Under the contract with DCJ, your organisation agreed to keep proper accounts and records of your use of DCJ funds, and to keep them separately to your other accounts and records.

While annual accountability requires indirect contract administration costs to be reported as a total only in the Contracting Portal, your accounts and records are expected to support the figure you’ve reported. DCJ may, at its discretion, require you to provide an itemised breakdown.

Refer to the examples of items that typically would be reported, or download the Income & Expenditure Statement template for a more comprehensive list of examples.

Is it acceptable to charge a flat rate or a percentage?

We understand that it may be difficult to track indirect costs in organisations that hold multiple contracts with DCJ and/or other government agencies.

For this reason, DCJ will accept a certain percentage of the contract funding amount as a means of apportioning indirect contract administration costs for different contracts.

However, the percentage used must be justifiable to actual indirect costs incurred while providing the services agreed in each contract. This percentage of the funding must:

  • be reported as a value in the Indirect contract administration costs field of the contract-level accountability form in the Contracting Portal
  • be reflected in the accompanying income and expenditure statement
  • not form part of any other expenditure reported for the same contract or another contract.

We ask that your organisation regularly reviews the percentage used to ensure it reflects actual costs incurred and it doesn’t result in large variances between the actual and percentage allocated costs.

DCJ may, at its discretion, require further information and justification to determine the validity of the percentage used, and how it was derived.

Frequently asked questions

1. How long will it take to complete all the required details in the Contracting Portal?

2. How do I find out who my DCJ contract manager is?

3. How and where we can add authorised signatories who are able to sign off on DCJ documentation?

4. Re item 6 on the contract-level form (proceeds from disposal of DCJ-funded assets):
Why can’t service providers depreciate assets purchased using DCJ funds? If an asset isn't sold but eventually outlives its usefulness, can we include it in the depreciation schedule?

5. Is there a set amount of funding that can be used for the purchase of assets?

6. Where do we report government subsidies to assist with our response to COVID-19 and/or the 2022 floods?

7. Can we roll over unspent COVID-19 payments, or do we need approval from the department?

8. The document 'Reporting annual accountability 2021–22' has a special note for Permanency Support Program (PSP) providers that payments for alternative care arrangements (ACA) must have a separate line in the income and expenditure statement. Does this also apply to individual placement arrangements (IPA) and  Complex Needs Payments?

9. Re item 7 on the contract-level form (other contract-related payments):
We have accrued income based on what we believe the Permanency Support Program (PSP) clients should be paid by DCJ. Since the reconciliation hasn’t been completed by DCJ, this figure may change once the reconciliation is done. Should we include these? Also, in relation to Complex Needs Payments, we haven’t received confirmation from DCJ whether you agree with our figures, so we won't be able to accrue this income. Are they to be included at item 7?

10. How do we report alternative care arrangement (ACA) reimbursements?

11. Re item 1 on the contract-level form (income received from DCJ):
For Permanency Support Program (PSP) providers, does this prepopulated figure include payments for alternative care arrangement (ACA), individual placement arrangements (IPA) and Complex Needs Payments?

12. What do we do if our organisation doesn’t comply with one of the paragraphs in either the service provider declaration for corporate-level accountability or the annual accountability certification for contract-level accountability?


1. How long will it take to complete all the required details in the Contracting Portal?

It should take less than an hour, depending on complexity and your familiarity with the process.

You’ll be able to answer many questions in the Contracting Portal by referring to:

  • your income and expenditure statement, for questions on the contract-level form, and
  • your full organisation financial statements, for questions on the corporate-level form.

So have those documents on hand when entering your responses.

Also, the questions don’t vary very much from year to year, so this makes it easier for you to complete the forms.

Use the guide to reporting annual accountability and other resources to prepare for the questions.

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2. How do I find out who my DCJ contract manager is?

Your DCJ contract manager for the contract is listed in two places in the Contracting Portal.

When you navigate to a Program Level Agreement (PLA) record, the contract manager is listed on the top on the screen with the rest on the PLA details. You'll also find the contract manager's details on the bottom of the Acquittals details page, under the form.

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3. How and where we can add authorised signatories who are able to sign off on DCJ documentation?

You can provide the details of your board or committee members, as well as key executives, in the Contracting Portal.

  1. Add the individuals as ‘users’.
  2. In their job title, indicate the position that they hold on the governance body or that they are an authorised signatory.
  3. You don’t need to change their status to ‘active’ nor do you need to give them a user type if they won’t be required to access the portal.

You can get further instructions on adding a user from the portal Help menu.

Find out more about authorised signatories

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4. Re item 6 on the contract-level form (proceeds from disposal of DCJ-funded assets):
Why can’t service providers depreciate assets purchased using DCJ funds? If an asset isn't sold but eventually outlives its usefulness, can we include it in the depreciation schedule?

You may depreciate assets in your organisation's accounts, as required by the accounting standards.

However, don’t report asset depreciation in the income and expenditure statements for DCJ contracts nor in the form on the Contracting Portal.

This is because:

  1. Any asset purchased with DCJ funds has already been claimed outright as an expense against the contract funding in the financial year of purchase.
  2. To claim depreciation on the same asset in subsequent years is to claim an additional deduction for an expense already claimed.

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5. Is there a set amount of funding that can be used for the purchase of assets?

No.

However, we recommend your organisation performs a cost-benefit analysis to justify the amount allocated to an asset's purchase, so that it doesn’t affect delivery on the contracted services. Please refer to your contract and also contact your DCJ contract manager to ensure reasonable steps have been taken prior to purchase of any assets.

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6. Where do we report government subsidies to assist with our response to COVID-19 and/or the 2022 floods?

Report any of the following as a corporate-level subsidy in your financial statements:

  • payments and/or grants from the Commonwealth Government
  • special grant payments from DCJ, such as the COVID-19 Partnership Grant, the COVID-19 Regional Partnership Grant, and the Social Sector Support Fund, as well as the Social Sector Transformation Fund
  • payments and/or grants from other NSW Government agencies.

You don’t have to acquit the funds or report them as income for any of your of DCJ contracts.

However, if your organisation received a special payment from DCJ to assist with your response to COVID-19, and it wasn’t a special grant with its own contract, you must report the funds as income for the applicable DCJ contracts.

This is fully explained in ‘Reporting government subsidies’, on page 3 of the guide to Reporting annual accountability 2021–22.

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7. Can we roll over unspent COVID-19 payments, or do we need approval from the department?

You can only roll over unspent COVID-19 payments if we gave your organisation an extension to carry forward spending. This includes payments for:

  • the non-government refuge cleaning stimulus funding
  • FOCAS (Family Outreach and Child Adolescent Services) brokerage made available in the 2021–22 financial year to the relevant Specialist Homelessness Services and Homeless Youth Assistance Program providers
  • expanding services in the area of domestic and family violence, including payments under the National Partnership Agreement and additional funding for Staying Home Leaving Violence.

2021–22 FOCAS funding may be rolled over pending performance review by your DCJ contract manager. You’ll be notified of the review’s outcome when it’s completed.

Any unspent portion of the 2020–21 FOCAS and 2020–21 Under 16’s stimulus package must be returned to DCJ during the 2021–22 annual accountability process.

This is explained in ‘Exceptions to the unspent funds general requirements for 2021–21’ on page 6 of the guide to the guide to Reporting annual accountability 2021–22.

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8. The document 'Reporting annual accountability 2021–22' has a special note for Permanency Support Program (PSP) providers that payments for alternative care arrangements (ACA) must have a separate line in the income and expenditure statement. Does this also apply to individual placement arrangements (IPA) and  Complex Needs Payments?

Yes. If you’ve received any payments outside of our contracting payments system (for example, on an invoice basis) for ACA, IPA and Complex Needs Payments, include a separate line item in your income and expenditure statement.

In addition, report such payments at item 7 on the contract-level form (other contract-related income).

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9. Re item 7 on the contract-level form (other contract-related payments):
We have accrued income based on what we believe the Permanency Support Program (PSP) clients should be paid by DCJ. Since the reconciliation hasn’t been completed by DCJ, this figure may change once the reconciliation is done. Should we include these? Also, in relation to Complex Needs Payments, we haven’t received confirmation from DCJ whether you agree with our figures, so we won't be able to accrue this income. Are they to be included at item 7?

Yes. Include Complex Needs Payments at item 7. And include a separate line item in the income and expenditure statement.

We understand there are cases of unreconciled amounts. In these cases, use the accounting standards of revenue recognition criteria to accrue such income, and report accordingly at the contract level. If required, you may need to seek further advice from your external accountant or auditor.

We also understand that the accrued amount may differ to actual income received at a later stage, and subsequent adjustment to accrual may be required.

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10. How do we report alternative care arrangement (ACA) reimbursements?

Include payments for ACA at item 7 on the contract-level form (other contract-related income). And include a separate line item in the income and expenditure statement.

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11. Re item 1 on the contract-level form (income received from DCJ):
For Permanency Support Program (PSP) providers, does this prepopulated figure include payments for alternative care arrangement (ACA), individual placement arrangements (IPA) and Complex Needs Payments?

No. Payments outside of our contracting payments system (for example, on an invoice basis) for ACA, IPA and Complex Needs Payments aren’t included at item 1.

Report such payments at item 7 on the contract-level form (other contract-related income). And include a separate line item in your income and expenditure statement.

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12. What do we do if our organisation doesn’t comply with one of the paragraphs in either the service provider declaration for corporate-level accountability or the annual accountability certification for contract-level accountability?

The declaration and certification forms both include a table where you can list any exceptions to meeting the requirements, and the reasons for the exceptions.

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Annual accountability survey results

Every year, service providers have the opportunity to provide feedback about their experience of the annual accountability process.

We didn’t run a survey of the 2018–19 annual accountability process in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Survey of the 2017–18 annual accountability process

We surveyed funded service providers and DCJ contract managers about the 2017–18 annual accountability process, covering our communication, the available resources, and our training and support.

We’ve collated the results of the survey into an infographic summarising our findings and outlining the improvements we intend to make. A text-only summary of the survey results is also available.

Survey of the 2016–17 annual accountability process

During March and April 2018, we conducted a survey of service providers who participated in the annual accountability process for the 2016–17 financial year.

This report summarises what we heard from you.

Support and assistance

Information video

Our annual accountability information video explains important aspects of annual accountability and your obligations. It also takes you through the process, including how to fill in the forms in the Contracting Portal.

Contact us

If you have any questions about annual accountability, or require support or assistance with any aspect of reporting your organisation’s annual accountability, contact your DCJ contract manager.

If you require assistance accessing or using the Contracting Portal, contact the Systems, Funding and Cards team.

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Last updated: 08 Jul 2022